“A renowned exorcist teams up with a rookie priest for his first day of training. As they plunge deeper into hell on earth, the lines between good and evil blur, and their own demons emerge.”

Director: Jusini P. Lange
Writer: Jusini P. Lange
Staring: Guy Pearce, Vadhir Derbez, Stephen Lang, Brady Jenness
Release Date: March 26, 2021

The Seventh Day (2021) pins veteran exorcist Father Peter (Guy Pearce) with rookie priest, Father Daniel (Vadhir Derbez). Father Pete is jaded to the business; he began his exorcising journey with a truly traumatic experience and therefore his approach to the process is unorthodox. Father Daniel is thrown into the fire and it becomes readily apparent that his first venture is going to be just as traumatizing as Father Peter’s was.

The quest that the duo have is cleansing the soul of Charlies (Brady Jenness). The young boy is aware that he is not himself, and when he loses total control, violence and destruction are left in his wake. Father Peter is the passenger’s seat as his apprentice does all the questioning, praying and prognosticating. The Seventh Day follows along a much-treaded story path and tries to rev the audiences attention with a twist ending.

This is where I have to deliver the bad news.

The plot twist at the end of The Seventh Day does not have any redeeming qualities for the story’s traction. If you don’t want this subpar horror/thriller movie spoiled, then skip the rest of this review and go check it out on Netflix.

It turns out that Father Peter is the demon that Father Daniel is meant to be confronting all along. The first scene of The Seventh Day shows the traumatic first exorcism that Father Peter was a part of, and it turns out that he himself is possessed as a result of the experience. Father Peter has been going around his entire life secretly operating as a demon undercover, His efforts are in an attempt to build a demon army to strike when Catholics and God finally take a rest. The reason The Seventh Day is called what it is is because God rested on the seventh day when he created earth. As Father Peter says while possessed: “Seventh day he rested. You see even God had a day off.”

The twist written out by director/writer Justin P. Lange does not hit any sort of emotional cord the way it is delivered. There are camera cuts and various bits that foreshadow what the truth really is, but if you have any sense for where a low budget horror movie like this is going, then you knew Father Peter wasn’t to be trusted at all., The redeeming part of this character is that he is played by Guy Pearce, who is BY FAR the best actor in the movie.

Pearce is having a time with his movie choices of late. In 2020 he had Bloodshot which was terrible, and he followed it up directly with The Seventh Day. Pearce reminded everyone that he can act in a great part of project with Mare Of Easttown, Pearce has dipped this toe int he directing world with Poor Boy (2021), a movie centered around two families who realize they are connected why events that happened in the past. There are no reviews yet for his project, or at least none that I can see.

Stephen Lang is also in The Seventh Day, playing the part of the Arch Bishop. According to IMDB, it is said that Lang was only on set for three days to complete he scenes. They are all in the same room and just two Father Peter and Father Daniel, so not too surprised there.

While Pearce is giving his best for what appears to be a money-grab project, and Lang is existing in a single room, we do have to talk about Vadhir Derbez. He was not strong playing the part of Father Daniel. The biggest problem with his performance is that I don’t see a lot of subtleness with his acting. Everything is out there for the audience to see, and that style of acting is not conducive for this particular project. Father Daniel is not understanding what’s around him throughout the entirety of the movie, so let the audience see his wheels churning in his head. Let the audience try to interpret for themselves rather than you spelling it out like an audience avatar.

The Seventh Day is not worth watching unless you are a glutton for B-rate horror movies or wanting to add a short movie to your movie list (definitely not personal).. This movie was filmed in 24 days and the script was written in 10 days. The small project comes all like a crammed work presentation where the outline of something potentially strong is there, but the filling is just a series of key words and hot air.

STANKO RATING: D (2.0/5 Stars)


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